CCL events this week: Imagined Authors: Reading the Homeric Question in Joyce’s Ulysses

A reminder of the events scheduled for this week:

The next seminar in the Sing in Me, Muse series is this Thursday, 8 December 2022, at 6.00pm (London time):

Sophie Corser, ‘Imagined Authors: Reading the Homeric Question in Joyce’s Ulysses’

The talk will be in person at Goldsmiths (Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW), in the Professor Stuart Hall Building, Room 326, and will be followed by a reception (room 314). We shall also stream the event for those unable to attend in person. A link will be sent shortly before the start.

Click here for more information and to register.

CCL events this week: The Auto / Bio / Fiction Series and the London Beckett Seminar

A reminder of two events scheduled for this week:

The next seminar in the Auto / Bio / Fiction series is this Thursday, 17 November 2022, at 5.30pm (London time):

Hywel Dix, ‘Autofiction and Cultural Memory’ and Hanna Meretoja, ‘Metanarrative Life-Writing: Intersections of Life and Narrative in Autofiction and Biofiction’.

Click here for more information and to register (registration is required to receive the zoom link).

 

On Friday 18 November 2022, at 6pm, as part of the London Beckett Seminar, Dr Michael Krimper (Gallatin School of Individualized Study, New York University) will present the paper “The Insurgent Art of Failure: Beckett, Sade and the Lost Volume of Transition”.

To attend, please register by email.

Reminder: First Sing in Me, Muse seminar today: Abigail Ardelle Zammit

A reminder that the first seminar in the Sing in me, Muse: The Classical, the Critical, and the Creative is tonight at 5.30 GMT.

Poet Abigail Ardelle Zammit will read from her work in progress #wearedaphne and discuss how she has adopted hybridity and erasure as a vehicle for dissent. Her dialogue with Ovid’s Metamorphoses employs the violence of the blackout technique as literary tool and political commentary, selecting and obscuring words from Ovid’s tales – most noticeably from Daphne’s transformation into a tree – to retell the events leading to and following the assassination of the controversial Maltese investigative journalist Daphna Caruana Galizia.

Click here for more information and for the booking link – registration is required to receive the zoom link to attend.

 

Reminder: First Auto / Bio / Fiction seminar today: Michael Lackey and Jenny Rademacher

A reminder that the first seminar in the Auto / Bio / Fiction series is today at 5.30pm UK time:

Michael Lackey, “Zora Neale Hurston and Thomas Mann: Moses Biofictions as Political Interventions” and Jenny Rademacher, “Derivative Lives: 21st Century Spanish Biofictions in Speculative Times”. Click here for more info and for the booking link – registration is required to receive the zoom link (please register by 5pm)

 

2022-23 Programme of the London Beckett Seminar

The programme of the London Beckett Seminar has been published on our website. The next seminar will take place tomorrow, 21 October, at 6-7pm (BST):

Dr Hannah Simpson (The University of Edinburgh), “Samuel Beckett and Disability Performance”

To receive a link to attend, please email londonbeckettseminar@gmail.com.

Details below, with our best wishes – enjoy it!

 

Dr Hannah Simpson (The University of Edinburgh), “Samuel Beckett and Disability Performance”

Samuel Beckett’s plays have attracted a striking range of disability performances—that is, performances that cast disabled actors, regardless of whether their roles are explicitly described as “disabled” in the text. What is it about Beckett’s stage plays that attracts disability performance? What does a performance that translates a Beckett script in explicitly disabled terms do to our understanding of that text, or to our understanding of Beckett’s work more broadly? Or, more specifically: what do such performances reveal about these playtexts’ persistent concern with the conditions of embodied existence, and with the impaired body and mind?

Drawing on my new monograph, Samuel Beckett and Disability Performance, this talk addresses these questions with reference to historic and contemporary disability performances of Beckett’s work, and a new theorising of Beckett’s “disability aesthetic”. Hanna Marron as Winnie (Happy Days, dir. Michael Guvrin, 1985), Harold Pinter as Krapp (Krapp’s Last Tape, dir. Ian Rickson, 2006), Nabil Shaban and Garry Robson, and Dan Moran and Chris Jones as Hamm and Clov (Endgame, dir. Robert Rae, 2007, and Joe Grifasi, 2012), Jess Thom as Mouth (Not I, dir. Matthew Pountney, 2017), and Tommy Jessop and Otto Baxter as Vladimir and Estragon (Waiting for Godot, dir. Sam Curtis Lindsay and Daniel Vais, 2018): these productions emphasise or rework previously undetected indicators of disability in Beckett’s work. More broadly, they reveal how Beckett’s theatre compulsively interrogates alternative embodiments, unexpected forms of agency, and the extraordinary social interdependency of the human body.

HANNA SIMPSON is Lecturer in Drama and Performance in the Department of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh. She previously served as the first Rosemary Pountney Junior Research Fellow in British and European Theatre at St Anne’s College, University of Oxford. She is the author of Samuel Beckett and the Theatre of the Witness: Pain in Post-War Francophone Drama (Oxford University Press, 2022) and Samuel Beckett and Disability Performance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022). She is also Theatre Review Editor for The Beckett Circle and welcomes contact from anyone interested in reviewing for us.

The CCL’s 2022-23 programme of events

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

Despite the difficulties of last year and the departure of some great colleagues, the CCL is alive and kicking, and about to kick off with a fantastic programme of events for 2022-23.

Our first CCL Annual Lecture will be given on 24 November 2022 by Marina Warner, with the title “Viral Spiral: Multiple Shape-shifting from Ovid to Covid”. You can attend in person (and have a drink with us afterwards!) or watch it online – click on the title to read more about it and book.

Two regular series of events will run in parallel through the academic year, during term time:

The Auto / Bio / Fiction series aims to put in dialogue (and possibly in dispute) different interpretations and practices of biofiction, autofiction and neighbouring genres and art forms, and discuss the questions raised by these forms and their critical and textual encounters.

We start on 27 October 2022 with Michael Lackey and Jenny Rademacher, and hope to see many of you there. Click on the links for more details and to register. All events for this series will be online, on Thursdays at 5.30pm (UK time).

The Sing in Me, Muse: The Classical, the Critical, and the Creative series will bring together scholars and students from a variety of disciplines with creative writers and other artists, to examine how the literary and material cultures of ancient Greece, the Near East and Rome have been adapted and rewritten at later times and other places.

We start on 3 November 2022, in collaboration with the Goldsmiths Writers’ Centre, with Maltese poet Abigail Ardelle Zammit. Abigail will read from her work and talk about her #wearedaphne project, which retells, through erasures of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the assassination of Maltese investigative journalist Daphna Caruana Galizia.

This event will be online, but several of the other talks in this series will be in person, too.  All are on Thursdays, either at 5.30 or at 6pm. Click on the links to find out more and register.

On 24 March 2023, we’ll join forces with the Decadence Research Centre to host a day symposium on Decadence and the Fairy Tale – look out for more details soon.

Following the success of the first Spectacular Orientalism conference last June, on 27-28 April 2023 we will host the second Spectacular Orientalism conference, organised in collaboration with the Society for European Festivals Research, and focusing this time more specifically on Asia and the Far East.  The deadline to propose papers is 17 December 2022, and all details can be found on the Call for Papers page.

And given the success of our May 2022 Postcolonial Theatre series, look out for the announcement of the May 2023 Postcolonial Theatre Series.

Looking forward to seeing you in person or online for any or all of the occasions above (and the further delights that are being planned and will be announced in due course…),

With warmest wishes,

Lucia, Clare, Marie-Claude and Isobel

Reminder: Spectacular Orientalism in Early Modern Europe (1529-1683), Conference, 8-9 June 2022

A reminder that the Conference Spectacular Orientalism in Early Modern Europe (1529-1683) will take place on 8-9 June:

Day One: The Public Stage (8 June 2022, 1:45-5.00pm, BST)

Day Two: Festivals (9 June 2022, 2.00-5.10pm, BST)

These two half-days of talks and discussion will explore new perspectives on the representation of the Orient in early modern European art and performance between 1529 and 1683, the period framed by the two sieges of Vienna by Ottoman armies. The conference will examine different settings in which the Orient was imagined and talked about. In particular it will interrogate various types of public display common in early modern societies, in which the self-projection of power and identity was often interwoven with the spectacle of the Other: courtly and public festivals, civic ceremonies and rituals, etc. It will also consider staged productions, notably operas and ballets, whose multisensorial character added to the inherent orientalist tendency towards display, while heightening the attraction of the exotic for their audiences.

Find out more about the conference, read the programme, the abstracts, and book (registration is free but it is required to receive the link to attend).

Please note that the programme was amended on 3 June.

The Conference is organised by the CCL in collaboration with the Society for European Festivals Research.

Reminder:  Refracted from the Canon: The Transmuted Form of Europe’s Ambassador to Africa – a talk by Sola Adeyemi (26 May 2022, 6pm BST)

A reminder that Sola Adeyemi‘s talk Refracted from the Canon: The Transmuted Form of Europe’s Ambassador to Africa will take place on Thursday 26 May 2022, at 6 pm BST (online).

This is the third of three events in the CCL’s Postcolonial Theatre series, May 2022

In this presentation, Sola Adeyemi will explore the idea of tragedy from the perspective of Yoruba culture, framing this exploration from the refracted premise of classical European canon and how the meaning of tragedy has been altered to become part of the arsenal of anticolonial agency as deployed to the consecrated ritual space of the Yoruba people of West Africa. Focusing on the re-reading – or re-interpretation – of Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarkand Euripides’ Bacchae, the talk aims to show that the process of re-interpreting the essence of the canonical god in the new space of Yoruba culture, or of translating the attributes with a new understanding and awareness, is more dialectical and more interwoven than the historical or anthropological process of re-working canonical texts by African writers…. Read more.

Attendance is free but booking will be essential to receive a link to attend.

The talk will be recorded and a video will be posted on the event’s webpage as soon as possible after the end.

Dr Sola Adeyemi is a Lecturer in Drama at the University of East Anglia. His researches are in world theatre and performance studies, African Literary Studies, and postcolonial literature and theatre (and the themes of decolonial and Global South studies). He is the author of Vision of Change in African Drama: Deconstructing Identity and Reconfiguring History (2019). Currently, he is working on ‘Dramatizing the Postcolony: Nigerian Drama and Theatre. His latest research is on performances after apartheid in South Africa and in Nigeria after the military dictatorship morphed into situations of ‘undeclared’ pre-colonial feudalistic insurrections, titled “Laughing from Both Barrels: New Satire in Modern African Performances”.

Sola’s talk will be chaired by Professor Samuel Kasule. Professor Kasule holds a BA in English and Drama and Diploma in Education from Makerere University, Uganda, and MA in Theatre Studies and PhD in Drama and Theatre from the University of Leeds. He is a founding member of the African Theatre Association and founding Reviews Editor of African Performance Review (APR). He was the President of the African Theatre Association between 2014 and 2020. His latest work (with Osita Okagbue) is Theatre and Performance in East Africa (London: Routledge, 2021).

 

 

CCL Spectacular Orientalism Conference programme

The CCL is pleased to announce the Programme of the Conference Spectacular Orientalism in Early Modern Europe (1529-1683).

The conference will be held on the afternoons of 8 and 9 June 2022:

Day One: The Public Stage (8 June 2022, 1:45-5.00pm, BST)

Day Two: Festivals (9 June 2022, 2.00-5.00pm, BST)

These two half-days of talks and discussion will explore new perspectives on the representation of the Orient in early modern European art and performance between 1529 and 1683, the period framed by the two sieges of Vienna by Ottoman armies.

The conference will examine different settings in which the Orient was imagined and talked about. In particular it will interrogate various types of public display common in early modern societies, in which the self-projection of power and identity was often interwoven with the spectacle of the Other: courtly and public festivals, civic ceremonies and rituals, etc.

It will also consider staged productions, notably operas and ballets, whose multisensorial character added to the inherent orientalist tendency towards display, while heightening the attraction of the exotic for their audiences.

Find out more about the event, read the abstracts, and book to attend (registration is free but it is required to receive the link to attend).

Please check the programme page again in case of last-minute amendments.

The Conference is organised by the CCL in collaboration with the Society for European Festivals Research.

 

Reminder:  Reimagining the Victorian Past in African and in Black Diasporic Theatre – a talk by Tiziana Morosetti (19 May 2022, 6pm BST)

A reminder that Tiziana Morosetti‘s talk Reimagining the Victorian Past in African and in Black Diasporic Theatre will take place on Thursday 19 May 2022, at 6 pm BST (online).

This is the second of three events in the CCL’s Postcolonial Theatre series, May 2022

Several African American and Black British playwrights have engaged in the past 25 years with material from the Victorian past. If issues of slavery and segregation have been at the forefront, aligning theatre to neo-Victorian and neo-Slavery narratives, Black playwrights have also engaged with specific figures from the long 19th century. Tiziana Morosetti’s paper will consider recent Black British plays that specifically engage with the Victorian past and will compare them to two Nigerian examples that display similar engagement. The paper will argue these examples, while displaying a closer focus on African history and overall different aesthetics, complement the vision of Black British playwrights by commenting on, and proposing counter-narratives to, the relation between Black cultures and white British power during the reign of Victoria… Read more.

Attendance is free but booking will be essential to receive a link to attend.

The talk will be recorded and a video will be posted on the talk’s page as soon as possible after the end.

Dr Tiziana Morosetti is an Associate Lecturer in Theatre and Performance at Goldsmiths, University of London. She is also an affiliate to the African Studies Centre, Oxford. She works on representations of race, Blackness and diversity on the 19th-century and contemporary British stage; and on Black drama, especially African. She is the editor of Staging the Other in Nineteenth-century British Drama (Peter Lang 2016), Africa on the Contemporary London Stage (Palgrave 2018) and, with Osita Okagbue, The Palgrave Handbook of Theatre and Race (2021). She is the General Secretary of the African Theatre Association UK (AfTA) and the co-founder and deputy director of the journal Quaderni del ’900.

Tiziana’s talk will be chaired by Lynette Goddard, Professor of Black Theatre and Performance at Royal Holloway, University of London. Their research focuses on documenting and analysing the contemporary histories of contemporary Black British theatre by looking at the politics of representation and the careers of performers, playwrights and directors. As well as numerous articles and chapters, they have published two full-length monographs Staging Black Feminisms: Identity, Politics, Performance (Palgrave, 2007) and Contemporary Black British Playwrights: Margins to Mainstream (Palgrave, 2015), one shorter book, Errol John’s Moon on a Rainbow Shawl (Routledge, 2017), and co-edited Modern and Contemporary Black British Drama (Palgrave, 2014). They selected and introduced the plays for The Methuen Drama Book of Plays by Black British Writers (2011) and wrote introductions for Mojisola Adebayo Plays One (Oberon, 2011) and Mojisola Adebayo Plays Two (Oberon, 2019). They are currently co-editing the anthology Black British Queer Plays and Practitioners (Methuen) and the two-volume Routledge History of Contemporary British Theatre.