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Exploring Goldsmiths’ Theses Collection

Over the summer, the Online Research Collections team in the Library, along with our cataloguing colleagues Diana Stevenson and Joanna Martin have been working on a project to make all Goldsmiths theses from 2020 to July 2021 available on our institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO). Providing access to our theses from the last two years has been delayed due to a variety of factors relating to COVID-19 so it is great to finally make them available.

The PhD theses we hold are a unique record of the academic, intellectual and research culture at Goldsmiths from the 1960s onwards. Our thesis collection is one of our most heavily used digital collections, so now that our most recent theses are accessible online, we thought it would be a good time to provide an overview of our collection and highlight its richness and diversity.

PhD research at Goldsmiths

In the 1960s and 1970s Goldsmiths rapidly expanded its portfolio of courses and started to offer postgraduate studies and research opportunities across the arts and humanities.

The earliest doctorate thesis that we hold is Marie Cecilia Wragg’s The development of emotional and social maturity in boys and girls in certain grammar, comprehensive and modern schools awarded in 1964. Dr Wragg was an educational psychologist and teacher who worked extensively in England and around the world. During her PhD research Dr Wragg clearly made much use of the Library, noting the help of ‘the assistant librarians at Goldsmiths’ College’ in her acknowledgements. While completing her PhD in the 1960s, she worked at Goldsmiths as a senior lecturer in the Education department and as a Hall of Residence Head. Following the completion of her PhD, Dr Wragg travelled widely in India, writing a number of journal articles about her investigations into educational psychology, teacher training and higher education in the country.

It was only in the 1980s that a large volume of theses started to be produced at Goldsmiths, with the Library holding 114 theses from the decade. In the 1990s, 138 theses were produced and in the 2000s the number had risen to 486, with numbers now averaging around 100 theses per year.

Our theses collection

The Library holds over 1,500 bound copies of theses. Our full collection of hard bound theses is available on Library Search. In normal circumstances, all bound theses on the catalogue can be consulted in the Library but due to COVID-19 restrictions this service is currently suspended.

The requirement to submit both an electronic and bound copy of a thesis has been in place at Goldsmiths since 2010, with our electronic thesis collection held on our institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO). In addition to that, we have retrospectively digitised theses from earlier years, as a part of the British Library’s EThOS service . Due to COVID-19 adjustments, PhD candidates in 2020-21 have been asked to submit their final thesis in digital format only.

In total, there are over 1,300 theses available in GRO (these are also accessible through Library Search). To browse our full digital collection on GRO just go to the browse menu and select ‘Item Type’ followed by ‘Thesis’. A range of FAQs on accessing digital theses on GRO is available here.

Moving from a collection of hard bound theses held in our store, to a digital collection accessible to anyone in the world with an internet connection has increased the visibility of our thesis collection and reduced barriers to accessing these valuable and unique resources. Providing free, online access also benefits our authors by increasing the reach of their work and the potential that it will be cited, as well as helping to promote their research during the early stages of their academic career.

Highlights from the collection

Our earliest electronic thesis dates back to 1982. Some of our earliest electronic theses from the 1980s include work produced by researchers still associated with Goldsmiths including Alan Pickering, Sophie Day, and Heidi Safia Mirza  , who wrote a short account of her experiences completing a PhD as a single mother in the 1980s which is well worth a read.

Our repository collection covers a huge range of areas and includes creative writing and practice research theses. The collection includes work by a number of former and current Library colleagues, along with theses by notable alumni such as the art historian and broadcaster David Dibosa , the Booker Prize winning author Bernardine Evaristo, the 2021 Turner Prize nominee Daniel Fernandes Pascual , and the joint winner of the Turner Prize in 2019 Lawrence Abu Hamdan.

Theses are amongst the most downloaded items in GRO. Over the past year our most downloaded thesis Valerie Welbanks’ Foundations of Modern Cello Technique; Creating the Basis for a Pedagogical Method has been accessed over 3,320 times. Our next most downloaded thesis, Rosa Crepax’s The Aesthetics of Mainstream Androgyny: A Feminist Analysis of a Fashion Trend has 1,470 downloads, followed by Jennifer May Brand’s From Design to Decline: Boosey & Hawkes and Clarinet Manufacturing in Britain, 1879-1986  with 1,268 downloads.

Our list of the most downloaded theses of all time gives a sense of the diverse range of postgraduate research taking place ate Goldsmiths and emphasises the value to authors of making their thesis open access.

Author Title Downloads
Sandra Gaudenzi The Living Documentary: from representing reality to co-creating reality in digital interactive documentary 16,432
Andrew Sockanathan Digital Desire and Recorded Music: OiNK, Mnemotechnics and the Private BitTorrent Architecture 13,172
Christopher Brauer Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology 12,852
Jacqueline Cooke Art ephemera, aka “Ephemeral traces of ‘alternative space’: the documentation of art events in London 1995-2005, in an art library” 11,351
Fiona Anne Seaton ’They Opened Up a Whole New World’: Feminine Modernity and the Feminine Imagination in Women’s Magazines, 1919-1939 11,335

Statistics collected 16 August 2021

 Further help and resources

If you wish to explore theses produced outside Goldsmiths, our Open Access Libguide includes links to a range of resources that will help you access theses produced in other UK universities and beyond.

As well as providing access to our PhD collection Library Search also includes many theses from other UK universities that are available through the British Library EThOS service.

For further guidance or questions about accessing our thesis collection, please get in touch with the Online Research Collections team at gro@gold.ac.uk

Pieter Sonke, Online Research Collections team

2021: Year of REF (and some other things), or What’s an Assessment For?

 

 

REF 2021 was completed and submitted earlier this year, in March 2021. The assessment by the REF panels is underway now, with results expected to be announced in Spring 2022.  In the following Goldsmiths Library blog post, Fred Flagg, one of 3 REF Project Officers at Goldsmiths supporting REF 2021, reflects on this colossal undertaking and on the wider picture of rankings and assessments.

For the first Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), the named year (2014) was the year of the assessment and release of the results. The work of submission was done by the end of 2013 with the results released in December 2014 (with a submission date in late November 2013 and all of the submitted work had to be published before 2014).  For the second REF, 2021 will be both the year of submission and most of the assessment. The REF 2021 results are expected in approximately April 2022.  The deadline was postponed four months until March 31st and the Goldsmiths, University of London submission to REF 2021 was submitted on March 25th (announced and celebrated in a 9th April Goldsmiths all-staff email from David Oswell, Pro-Warden for Research, Enterprise & Knowledge Exchange and Jane Boggan, Research Excellence Manager; email summarised at https://goldmine.gold.ac.uk/AdviceInformation/Pages/REF-2021.aspx (Please note that this link is to an internal Goldsmiths intranet site which is not publicly available).

Many other things were on our minds over 2020 and 2021, and the global SARS-COV2/COVID-19 pandemic put an exercise like the Research Excellence Framework in a harsher light than before.  How do you weigh and prioritise an exercise to measure national research during a global pandemic? There were debates within the academic community throughout 2020 (example of a case for a longer postponement at LSE Impact blog here, and against further postponement at Wonkhe here).  The delay of four months was the biggest mitigation made by Research England, but there were others, mostly allowing for delays caused by the pandemic (REF links here and here).

National assessments like the REF have been accumulating somewhat since the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) was launched as part of the Office for Students in 2015/2016.  The first Knowledge Exchange Framework was completed and published to little fanfare on 1st March 2021 (see dashboard of results here).  Reviews of both the TEF and National Student Survey have already been released this year (with the Subject component of TEF definitively removed, and the NSS largely unchanged for now.  Science minister Amanda Solloway discussed the REF in an October 2020 speech, stating that the reforms following 2016 Stern Review didn’t go far enough and that Research England and its counterparts in Northern Ireland, Scotland & Wales will be starting “a plan for reforming the REF after the current exercise is complete.”

Along with these completed (and anticipated) national reviews, it is worth reflecting on the immense local undertaking REF 2021 has been at Goldsmiths.  Colleagues across all academic departments, in the Library and across Goldsmiths have completed a large amount of difficult work, in circumstances far more difficult than usual.  In the Library Online Research Collections team, as the team that looks after the open-access institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online, we are responsible for the primary source of data on publications by Goldsmiths researchers.  We are currently reflecting on the work behind Goldsmiths’ REF 2021 with the goal of making the next submission as smooth as possible, whenever it rolls around.

Whatever happens with the national reviews and whatever we turn up in our local reflections, the open-access component of the next REF will follow the REF 2021 open access policy for the time being: any research published in a publication with an ISSN will be required to be made open-access within three months of the date of acceptance for publication (following publisher embargo periods as required).  The REF open-access policy is linked to UKRI’s open-access policy, so it is expected to change after UKRI releases the new version (expected ca. Summer 2021).  The UKRI OA policy consultation gives Research England and UKRI a deadline of “no later than six months after the UKRI policy is announced” for the release of the new REF policy.  As the UKRI policy will include a stronger open-access mandate, and is phasing in a new requirement for open-access for books and monographs, it is expected that the new REF policy will also include books and monographs eventually, but not expanding to include them until at least 2024.  This would be consistent with the current relationship between the RCUK (now UKRI) OA policy and the REF OA policy, with more strict open-access requirements for work funded by UKRI than for work submitted to the REF.

For anyone who is curious about a different format of research assessment, the Hidden REF is an alternative inspired by the REF that has recently closed (on 14th May) that plans to release its results in June.  For another thought-provoking take on metrics and assessment, Lizzie Gadd’s recent post at the LSE Impact blog extends the challenge of re-thinking research assessments even further, to considering the value and ethics of university rankings, with some constructive ideas for change included.  National assessments and rankings are not going away, and this observer suspects they are not likely to change drastically anytime soon either.  With all of the work, resources and employment invested in assessment, accreditation processes and rankings, it is still worth asking serious questions about them.

Fred Flagg

Open Access Week, 19 – 25 October 2020

Open Access Week is happening worldwide between 19 – 25 October 2020. It is an annual global event that aims to broaden awareness and understanding of Open Access. It also aims to promote the benefits of Open Access and to give practitioners an opportunity to share their experiences and inspire wider participation in the movement.

Open Access LibGuide

To mark this year’s Open Access Week , the Online Research Collections in the Library have created an online guide that provides an introduction to and overview of Open Access. The aim of the guide is to give a comprehensive introduction to Open Access publishing and it supports our commitment to making Open Access as easy as possible for our researchers at Goldsmiths. It is also aimed at students wishing to access Open Access resources, providing links to some of the key Open Access resources and browser tools.

Publisher Open Access Deals

The team have also created an introduction to the Publisher Open Access Deals Available to Goldsmiths Authors. These agreements, commonly known as Read and Publish agreements, combine the Library’s journal subscriptions with Open Access publication, enabling papers with a Goldsmiths corresponding author, to be made Gold Open Access. Goldsmiths currently has deals with SAGE, Springer and Wiley.

Plan S

One of the biggest current issues in Open Access is the implementation of Plan S.

At the end of 2018, cOAlition S – a consortium of research funders (including UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Wellcome Trust among others), supported by the European Commission and the European Research Council – launched a new Open Access publishing initiative called Plan S, which comes into effect on 1st January 2021. Plan S is an initiative that hopes to make immediate, full Open Access a reality by committing to the Open Access publication without embargo of all scholarly publications that result from research funded by public grants.

The team have put together a guide that explains Plan S and its impact on our researchers at Goldsmiths.

Open Access at Goldsmiths

There are articles on various aspects of Open Access on the Library Blog that give a taster of the range of Open Access activities taking place at Goldsmiths, including a reflection on Open Access from the perspective of a postgraduate student at Goldsmiths, Open Access developments in response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, a short introduction  on using Open Access Button and Unpaywall to discover Open Access content online, and even an Open Access Limerick .

The Online Research Collections team support and develop Open Access provision at Goldsmiths through our institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) and our Open Access journal platform Goldsmiths Journals Online (GOJO).  For all Open Access enquiries, please contact the Online Research Collections team at Goldsmiths gro@gold.ac.uk

Open Access and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Image by Jack Adamson as part of the UN COVID-19 Response, available on Unsplash

Open access to research has been in the news from the beginning of the SARS CoV2 – COVID-19 pandemic and it continues to be a hot topic as the world’s academics and universities grapple with the worldwide emergency. Open access can be hard to define; the best short definition is: “free availability and unrestricted use” (courtesy of open access publisher PLoS and author and academic Peter Suber). Much of the world’s research literature is not freely available and is heavily restricted by copyright, behind the barrier of expensive subscription paywalls, making global research collaboration difficult. Fred Flagg, from the Library’s Online Research Collections team, looks at the open access developments unfolding throughout the year so far in response to the pandemic.

Pre-prints

Open access pre-prints are getting tons of publicity, and rightly so as they enable researchers to share initial information rapidly. Pre-prints are early manuscripts of research outputs released to the public before peer review, and they are one of the founding elements of open access, with the Physics & Mathematics pre-print subject repository ArXiv freely available and widely used since 1991. The Biology subject repository BioRxiv was one of the first places to make available COVID-19 related preprints (starting January 2020). Since pre-prints and working papers (as they are called in the social sciences) are draft versions, it is risky to draw final conclusions from them (for more about pre-prints, see this short article by open access expert Danny Kingsley, and for a list of subject repositories see the Open Access Directory).

Pandemic open access

With most libraries closed (Goldsmiths Library resources available at this Goldsmiths LibGuide) many publishers have been quick to extend access to their journals and e-books which are under paywalls in ordinary times. This “pandemic open access” includes many offers of free access to research publications related to COVID-19. For one list see this Wellcome Trust announcement, and for an example of a subscription article now made freely available by its publisher, see Rhodes, Lancaster & Rosengarten 2020.  There are also publishers providing expanded access to e-books.  For one list of COVID-19 vendor e-book access, see this list by University Information Policy Officers.  Many of these publisher access offers are likely to be temporary, so it is debatable if they count as open access, although “pandemic open access” is still an improvement over paywalls.  Also temporarily, additional large scale open access to digitised books has been made possible by not-for-profit organisations The Hathi Trust and, not without controversy, The Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library (available worldwide, despite the name).

Goldsmiths Research Online open access during the COVID-19 pandemic

By contrast, anything that is available in Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO, https://research.gold.ac.uk) is available permanently, and copyright and permissions for each item are confirmed by the Online Research Collections team in the Library (also known as the GRO team).  Academics at Goldsmiths have been writing and publishing widely in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  We are adding these pandemic-related items to GRO with the keyword “COVID-19”, and a keyword search currently returns 24 items (including Rhodes, Lancaster & Rosengarten 2020 above, Will Davies in the London Review of Books, Angela McRobbie in the Verso Books blog, and several articles in Discover Society to name just a few).  This number will increase as more is published, and although it is not always possible to provide an open access version, GRO has made several of these available to all by obtaining permissions from authors and publishers.  Of the 24 items tagged with “COVID-19” in GRO, 12 of these have full text copies available now, and more will become available as publisher embargo periods expire in 12 to 24 months.

Library Reps: Introductory session to Open Access

Otto (2012) Nick Crowe and Ian Rawlinson http://research.gold.ac.uk/6756/ Creative Commons: Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0

The Online Research Collections team in the Library was recently invited to deliver a training session to the Goldsmiths Student Library Reps.

Open Access at Goldsmiths

The concept of Open Access is central to everything that the Online Research Collections team do. Open Access is the process by which online research outputs are made free for anyone to view, read and download, without the need to log in or make a payment. Where possible, Open Access materials should be free of most copyright restrictions.

The team support and develop Open Access provision at Goldsmiths through our institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) and our Open Access journal platform Goldsmiths Journals Online (GOJO). Currently, there over 21,00 Open Access items on GRO that can be accessed by anyone in the world with an internet connection and there have been nearly 3 million downloads from the repository since 2006.

Total number of items on GRO 21,053
Total number of Open Access items 7,487
Total number of downloads (all time) 2,998,225

 Open Access for students

In the past, our training and advocacy activities have largely focused on academic staff members and PhD students. Undergraduate and taught postgraduate students have largely been left out of our conversations around Open Access, so this was a great opportunity for us to engage with a new audience.

Our current training activities emphasise the benefits Open Access to researchers and the way that it can improve the global visibility, readership and impact of their work, both within academia and more widely. However, Open Access is also enormously beneficial to students as it offers easy access to research outputs, and they can benefit just as much as those further into their academic careers by knowing how to find, evaluate, and use Open Access resources.

Introducing Open Access to the Library Reps

Our session with the Library Reps started with an introduction to the concept of Open Access and then explored some of the key issues around copyright and licensing. We then demonstrated how to find Open Access resources on GRO and Library Search . We also introduced the Reps to some of the key Open Access resources available and useful browser tools to help them discover Open Access content online such as Unpaywall and Open Access Button .

The session was a really good way of raising awareness of Open Access with a new audience and the team is very enthusiastic about delivering future sessions to our students at Goldsmiths.

Marco Pace, Library Rep for Music, on Open Access

 Marco Pace, the postgraduate Library Rep for Music, attended the session and was invited to reflect on the relevance of Open Access to his studies and its impact on his role as a Library Rep.

As a Masters student, I believe that the session with the Open Access team was very useful in letting me understand an extensive range of resources that are available, whose existence I was not aware of. These databases would have helped me, for instance, preparing the piece of academic writing needed for my application to Goldsmiths: as a mature student who had been several years out of higher education, the only access I had to academic literature was through books I bought. Also, it is important to know that when I leave Goldsmiths I will still have considerable access to specialist research such as PhD theses and Goldsmiths researchers’ output.

Databases such as EThOS, the British Library electronic theses online service, provide me a wealth of resources which are extremely focused, all of which also include in their literature review up-to-date introductions to their topics. As an example, I remember last term struggling to find information contained in a thesis of which I could only access a preview of, while a quick search on this database immediately produced incredibly suited (and free to access) entries that I could have used for my PhD research proposal.

The team offered a thorough explanation of how GRO and Open Access systems in general assist the dissemination of the findings of researchers, and how the world of academic research publications work. As a student considering pursuing a career in academia these are valuable insights, which will also help me strengthen my PhD research proposal – I can more effectively state that my findings would be shared in an openly accessible form.

On this regard, as part of the Student Library Rep Project, I was asked yesterday to add a book to the library which is in fact a published version of a recent PhD thesis. It represents high quality research on a very narrow topic (while I must prioritise items that would be helpful for the most students), and the book in itself is quite expensive: I can now put that request on hold in case more relevant items are requested in the next month, and in the meantime explain to the student who requested it how to access it through Open Access systems.

I believe that Open Access systems and especially GRO should receive more attention from Masters students too, especially in the induction week at the beginning of the academic year when the resources of the library are presented. I would not exclude the idea of mentioning these resources somewhere in the “how to apply” page for postgraduate courses: consider returning students who have been out of academia for a while or students coming from conservatoires where they were never asked to write essays (both applied to me), awareness of these tools would highly simplify the preparation of academic writings, personal statements or research proposals.

-Marco Pace

Open Access and REF: from 1 April

201603-LibraryBlog

From 1 April 2016, HEFCE will require that any peer-reviewed research article or conference proceeding with an ISSN must – to be eligible for REF2021 – be deposited into an institutional repository (i.e. Goldsmiths Research Online, GRO) and made Open Access.

In order that we send out useful, consistent and ultimately compliant information, Goldsmiths requires from now that all research active staff add their manuscripts (peer-reviewed research article/conference proceeding with ISSN) to GRO within 3 months of the final acceptance date
 
What needs to be deposited into GRO?

·      Article details: title, authors, journal
·      Full text: the author accepted manuscript, the final version after peer review and edits but without publisher formatting/pagination

What assistance is there to help staff?

·      The GRO team (James Bulley, Ozden Sahin and Jeremiah Spillane) are managed by Andrew Gray, Academic Services Librarian (a.gray@gold.ac.uk, 020 7919 7161)
·      They will check publisher permissions, apply relevant embargoes, input additional publication details and metadata, record issues and ‘exceptions’
·      Advice, training and assistance are available in person, via email gro@gold.ac.uk or over the phone (020 7919 7166)
·      Detailed information on the policy will be added to the Research & Enterprise website in the next month. Current information is available at http://research.gold.ac.uk/openaccess.html 
·      Tracy Banton, Head of Research Office, will be able to answer any REF queries that are not GRO-related ( t.banton@gold.ac.uk, 020 7919 7772)

Goldsmiths Research Online – August 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.08

Overview

40,585 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were Germany, United Kingdom and United States.

This month’s top downloaded item is a PhD thesis by Sandra Gaudenzi from the Centre for Cultural Studies.

PhD theses are again the most popular items in GRO. Two of the three top downloaded items this month were PhD theses:

The Living Documentary: from representing reality to co-creating reality in digital interactive documentary (2013) by Sandra Gaudenzi. (244 downloads)

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren. (211 downloads)

“On an Equal Footing with Men?” Women and Work at the BBC 1923-1939  by Catherine Murphy (189 downloads.)

New in GRO This Month

The GRO staff have been depositing the retrospective research outputs by faculty across the College this month. Research output that have been recently added to GRO can be found from the main GRO page

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the August report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – May 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.05

Overview

49,667 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, Germany, and United States.

This month’s top downloaded item is “Journalism: a profession under pressure?” a paper co-authored by Tamara Witschge, former research associate at the Department of Media and Communications’ Leverhulme Media Research Centre. Witschge’s paper looks at the changing aspects of the profession of journalism, and how these affect the autonomy of journalists.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (377 downloads).

Evaluating the theory of executive dysfunction in autism (2004) by Elisabeth L. Hill. (376 downloads)

FLOSSTV Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic (288 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Gustav Kuhn, Senior Lecturer at the Department of Psychology, has recently published an Open Access paper entitled “A framework for using magic to study the mind” in Frontiers in Psychology. You can download the full text here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11634/

Manuel Ramos Martinez from the Department of Visual Cultures deposited his paper “The Oxidation of the Documentary – The Politics of Rust in Wang Bing’s Tie Xi Qu: West of the Tracks,” recently published in Third Text. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11557/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the May report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – April 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.04

49,665 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

This month’s top downloaded item is an unpublished paper “Understanding the t-test as a variance ratio test, and why t-squared = F” by Rory Allen, Associate Lecturer in Psychology. Allen’s paper has reached many people through GRO even though it is not included in an academic publication, which shows the potential of Open Access repositories as a platform to circulate research.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Understanding the t-test as a variance ratio test, and why t-squared = F (2008) by Rory Allen (345 downloads).

FLOSSTV Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic (343 downloads).

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (311 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Dhiraj Murthy from the Department of Sociology published a paper entitled “Twitter and elections: are tweets, predictive, reactive, or a form of buzz?” in the Information, Communication & Society. Murthy’s paper looks at the relationship between the political activities on Twitter and the results from the ballot box. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11480/

Tom Perchard from the Department of Music has published a book called After Django: Making Jazz in Postwar France, which looks at the ways in which French musicians and critics interpret jazz in the mid-twentieth century. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11486/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the April report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – March 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.03

Overview

60,812 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and China.

Excitingly, this month we have a new number 1! The most downloaded entry in GRO this month was a paper entitled “Algorithmic States of Exception” by Daniel McQuillan, Lecturer in Creative & Social Computing. McQuillan’s paper looks at the practices of data mining through contemporary business models and mass surveillance, which he argues are leading to a new form of governance that he terms as “algorithmic states of exception,” a concept that he develops departing from philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s work.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Algorithmic States of Exception (2015) by Daniel McQuillan (429 downloads).

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (406 downloads).

The Theatrical Vision of Count Harry Kessler and its Impact on the Strauss-Hofmannsthal Partnership (2014), a doctoral thesis by Michael Reynolds (385 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Tom Henri from the Department of Social, Therapeutic & Community Studies (STaCS) and Sophie Fuggle from the Centre for Cultural Studies co-edited a book entitled Return to the Street, which includes different approaches to the idea of the street from across multiple disciplines. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11402/

Barley Norton from the Department of Music has recently published a multimedia report entitled “Ca Trù Singing in Vietnam: Revival and Innovation” in the Smithsonian Folkways Magazine Winter/Spring 2015. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11420/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the March report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.