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Goldsmiths Research Online – March 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.03

Overview

60,812 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and China.

Excitingly, this month we have a new number 1! The most downloaded entry in GRO this month was a paper entitled “Algorithmic States of Exception” by Daniel McQuillan, Lecturer in Creative & Social Computing. McQuillan’s paper looks at the practices of data mining through contemporary business models and mass surveillance, which he argues are leading to a new form of governance that he terms as “algorithmic states of exception,” a concept that he develops departing from philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s work.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Algorithmic States of Exception (2015) by Daniel McQuillan (429 downloads).

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (406 downloads).

The Theatrical Vision of Count Harry Kessler and its Impact on the Strauss-Hofmannsthal Partnership (2014), a doctoral thesis by Michael Reynolds (385 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Tom Henri from the Department of Social, Therapeutic & Community Studies (STaCS) and Sophie Fuggle from the Centre for Cultural Studies co-edited a book entitled Return to the Street, which includes different approaches to the idea of the street from across multiple disciplines. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11402/

Barley Norton from the Department of Music has recently published a multimedia report entitled “Ca Trù Singing in Vietnam: Revival and Innovation” in the Smithsonian Folkways Magazine Winter/Spring 2015. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11420/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the March report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – February 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.02

Overview

46,755 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

Supplementary video material has been added to FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis and one of the most popular items in GRO. The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren.

Border Landscapes: Religion, Space and Movement on the Polish Belarusian Frontier (2014) by Aimée Edith Joyce.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Noortje Marres from the Department of Sociology deposited a paper entitled “Why Map Issues? On Controversy as a Digital Method” to be published in Science, Technology and Human Values. You can access more information about the paper here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11342/

Mathilda Tham from the Department of Design deposited a book section entitledCreative resilience thinking in fashion and textiles” to be published in The Handbook of Textile Culture, a book edited by Janis Jefferies (Department of Computing), Diana Wood Conroy and Hazel Clark. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11304/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the February report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – January 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.01

Overview

46,375 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

The most downloaded GRO item this month is again FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis completed by Adnan Hadziselimovic in 2012. The three most popular items in GRO were all PhD theses:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Border Landscapes: Religion, Space and Movement on the Polish Belarusian Frontier (2014) by Aimée Edith Joyce.

Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology (2011) by Christopher Brauer.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Deirdre Osborne from the Department of Theatre and Performance Studies co-edited (along with Mary F. Brewer and Lynette Goddard) a book entitled Modern and Contemporary Black British Drama. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11078/

Alexander Watson from the Department of History deposited his paper “Unheard-of Brutality”: Russian Atrocities against Civilians in East Prussia, 1914-1915 published in The Journal of Modern History. You can access more information about the paper here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11072/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the January report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – December 2014 Update

GROBlog-2014.12

Overview

38,959 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

The most downloaded GRO item this month is again FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis completed by Adnan Hadziselimovic in 2012. The three most popular items in GRO were:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology (2011) by Christopher Brauer.

Dis-Orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music (1996), ed. by Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk, and Ash Sharma.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Pasi Valiaho from the Department of Media and Communications published a book entitled Biopolitical Screens: Image, Power, and the Neoliberal Brain. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11036/

Jane H. Desmarais from the Department of English and Comparative Literatute deposited her co-authored book (with Lawrence Goldie) Presence of Mind in Neurophysiological Processes. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11048/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the December report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

GRO: 2014 IN REVIEW

GROBlog2014inReview

As 2014 is coming to an end, we would like to give an overview of the past year in GRO.

We have had a steady increase in the number of uploads in GRO throughout 2014. 845 new items were added to GRO this year. The departments which deposited the most were Psychology, Computing, and Sociology. This resonates with the download pattern: the departments whose work was downloaded the most were Psychology, Sociology, and Art.

378,467 items were downloaded from GRO in 2014 (until mid-December). The download numbers peaked at 44,530 in October.

Countries that downloaded the most from GRO were United States (56,044 downloads), United Kingdom (47,344), and Germany (42,845). Besides these three countries, China, Australia, France, Romania, and Ukraine consistently made it to the top countries list throughout the year.

The most downloaded GRO item in 2014 was an An Interview with Ojibwe Novelist David Treuer, followed by two PhD theses. The most popular GRO items were:

Language and Signs: An Interview with Ojibwe Novelist David Treuer (2009) by Padraig Kirwan.

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology (2011) by Christopher Brauer.

PhD theses in general were the most downloaded items in GRO. This may be due to open access PhD theses’ ability to make available original research about specific subject areas even before they are published. Creative material, such as videos, artworks, design pieces and compositions, were also popular in 2014.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. Here are video tutorials for depositing your peer-reviewed paper, and practice-based work. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

GRODownlReport-2014

Goldsmiths Research Online – November 2014 Update

GROBlog-2014.11Overview

39,223 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were Germany, United Kingdom, and United States.

The most downloaded GRO item this month is again is FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis completed by Adnan Hadziselimovic in 2012. The three most popular items in GRO were:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.
Dis-Orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music (1996), ed. by Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk, and Ash Sharma.
Digital Desire and Recorded Music: OiNK, Mnemotechnics and the Private BitTorrent Architecture (2011) by Andrew Sockanathan.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Christopher French from the Department of Psychology published an article entitled “Magic and memory: using conjuring to explore the effects of suggestion, social influence, and paranormal belief on eyewitness testimony for an ostensibly paranormal event” in Frontiers in Psychology. You can read the full text here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10934/

Mark Bishop from the Department of Computing published a catalogue essay entitled “Consciousness and Creativity” for the recent Creative Machine exhibition at Goldsmiths curated by William Latham, Atau Tanaka, and Frederic Fol Leymarie from Computing. You can read the full text here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10857/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the November report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – October 2014 Update

GROBlog-2014.10

Overview

The total number of records in Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) at 31st October 2014 is 6,952. Over 100 new items were added to GRO during the month of October.

The most popular three GRO items of the month were all PhD theses. These were:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.
Digital Desire and Recorded Music: OiNK, Mnemotechnics and the Private BitTorrent Architecture (2011) by Andrew Sockanathan.
Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology (2011) by Christopher Brauer.

44,530 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were China, Germany and United States.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Sarah Kember from Media and Communications published a paper in Journal of Visual Culture about face recognition and smart photography. In this paper, Kember looks at two of the principal algorithms of face recognition technology to demonstrate the materialization of discriminatory ways of thinking through software. You can read the paper in full here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10827/

Rob Imrie from the Department of Sociology co-edited a book entitled Sustainable London? The Future of a Global City. “The book explores the rise of sustainable development policies in London, and evaluates their relevance and role in sustaining people and the places and environments that they live in.” (From the book description.) You can view the GRO deposit here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10725/

As part of the Open Access Week 2014, GRO held two events in October about open access, new HEFCE policies, and the next REF assessments. The slides of these talks can be found on GRO.

Open Access and REF2020: How not to let new HEFCE rules ruin your life: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10800/

Getting the Most out of Open Access Post Award: http://research.gold.ac.uk/10785/

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the October report here.

Open Access Resources for Researchers

OA-Resources

Open Access can be defined as free, unrestricted online access to scholarly research material. At Goldsmiths, we are using Goldsmiths Research Online (http://research.gold.ac.uk) to deposit research outputs by Goldsmiths academics and PhD researchers.

There are many other resources for locating Open Access material online. Here is a selected list of Open Access research repository and e-book resources.

Creative Commons Search: http://search.creativecommons.org/

OAIster: a catalog of 30 million records built by harvesting from open access collections worldwide. http://www.oclc.org/oaister.en.html

arXiv: 976,730 e-prints in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics. http://arxiv.org/

PubMed Central: Information resource for biomedical and health researchers. http://europepmc.org/

CERN Document Server: Over 1 million documents by European Organization for Nuclear Research. http://cds.cern.ch/

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine: http://www.base-search.net/

Hathi Trust Digital Library: Millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. http://www.hathitrust.org/home

Project Gutenberg: 46,000 free e-books. http://www.gutenberg.org/

Open Library: https://openlibrary.org/

Directory of Open Access Books: http://www.doabooks.org/

Directory of Open Access Journals: http://doaj.org/

Directory of Open Access Repositories: http://www.opendoar.org/find.php

Open Access Theses and Dissertations: http://oatd.org/

Creative Commons: The Basics

CC-Intro

Creative Commons (CC) is a licensing system that allows you to make your work open and accessible while at the same time keeping some rights.

To use Creative Commons licenses is easy: it is just a matter of indicating the type of CC license you wish to use along with your work. There is no additional procedure of registration.

Here is a list of the six main CC licenses:

CC BY (Attribution) allows others to distribute and build upon your work as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work.

CC BY-SA (Attribution-ShareAlike) allows others to distribute and build upon your work as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work and release their derivative work under an identical license.

CC BY-ND (Attribution-NoDerivs) allows others to distribute your work as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work and keep the original format of the work.

CC BY-NC (Attribution-NonCommercial) allows others to distribute and build upon your work non-commercially as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work and keep a non-commercial license for their derivative work.

CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike) allows others to distribute and build upon your work non-commercially as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work and release their derivative work under an identical license.

CC BY-NC-ND (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs) allows others to distribute your work as long as they credit you as the original creator of the work. However, they cannot change the work, or use it commercially.

In Goldsmiths Research Online, the default license for PhD theses that are publicly accessible is CC-BY-NC-ND (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs), the most restrictive of the six main CC licenses.

What is Goldsmiths Research Online?

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) is the open access research repository of Goldsmiths. Its aim is to bring together research outputs conducted by academics at the College. GRO holds material as diverse as books, journal articles, conference papers, exhibitions, artworks, and compositions.

Currently, there are nearly 7,000 items in GRO. These are being downloaded an average of 25,000 times per month. This means, currently, there is an average of 300,000 downloads from GRO per year.

These downloads come from different countries all over the world. In 2014 so far, the top five countries which downloaded the most from GRO are the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, China, and France.

As Goldsmiths Library, we encourage academics and PhD students to make their work open access by depositing their research outputs on GRO. You can search, browse, and add material to GRO on http://research.gold.ac.uk/