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Open Access and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Image by Jack Adamson as part of the UN COVID-19 Response, available on Unsplash

Open access to research has been in the news from the beginning of the SARS CoV2 – COVID-19 pandemic and it continues to be a hot topic as the world’s academics and universities grapple with the worldwide emergency. Open access can be hard to define; the best short definition is: “free availability and unrestricted use” (courtesy of open access publisher PLoS and author and academic Peter Suber). Much of the world’s research literature is not freely available and is heavily restricted by copyright, behind the barrier of expensive subscription paywalls, making global research collaboration difficult. Fred Flagg, from the Library’s Online Research Collections team, looks at the open access developments unfolding throughout the year so far in response to the pandemic.

Pre-prints

Open access pre-prints are getting tons of publicity, and rightly so as they enable researchers to share initial information rapidly. Pre-prints are early manuscripts of research outputs released to the public before peer review, and they are one of the founding elements of open access, with the Physics & Mathematics pre-print subject repository ArXiv freely available and widely used since 1991. The Biology subject repository BioRxiv was one of the first places to make available COVID-19 related preprints (starting January 2020). Since pre-prints and working papers (as they are called in the social sciences) are draft versions, it is risky to draw final conclusions from them (for more about pre-prints, see this short article by open access expert Danny Kingsley, and for a list of subject repositories see the Open Access Directory).

Pandemic open access

With most libraries closed (Goldsmiths Library resources available at this Goldsmiths LibGuide) many publishers have been quick to extend access to their journals and e-books which are under paywalls in ordinary times. This “pandemic open access” includes many offers of free access to research publications related to COVID-19. For one list see this Wellcome Trust announcement, and for an example of a subscription article now made freely available by its publisher, see Rhodes, Lancaster & Rosengarten 2020.  There are also publishers providing expanded access to e-books.  For one list of COVID-19 vendor e-book access, see this list by University Information Policy Officers.  Many of these publisher access offers are likely to be temporary, so it is debatable if they count as open access, although “pandemic open access” is still an improvement over paywalls.  Also temporarily, additional large scale open access to digitised books has been made possible by not-for-profit organisations The Hathi Trust and, not without controversy, The Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library (available worldwide, despite the name).

Goldsmiths Research Online open access during the COVID-19 pandemic

By contrast, anything that is available in Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO, https://research.gold.ac.uk) is available permanently, and copyright and permissions for each item are confirmed by the Online Research Collections team in the Library (also known as the GRO team).  Academics at Goldsmiths have been writing and publishing widely in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  We are adding these pandemic-related items to GRO with the keyword “COVID-19”, and a keyword search currently returns 24 items (including Rhodes, Lancaster & Rosengarten 2020 above, Will Davies in the London Review of Books, Angela McRobbie in the Verso Books blog, and several articles in Discover Society to name just a few).  This number will increase as more is published, and although it is not always possible to provide an open access version, GRO has made several of these available to all by obtaining permissions from authors and publishers.  Of the 24 items tagged with “COVID-19” in GRO, 12 of these have full text copies available now, and more will become available as publisher embargo periods expire in 12 to 24 months.

Library Reps: Introductory session to Open Access

Otto (2012) Nick Crowe and Ian Rawlinson http://research.gold.ac.uk/6756/ Creative Commons: Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0

The Online Research Collections team in the Library was recently invited to deliver a training session to the Goldsmiths Student Library Reps.

Open Access at Goldsmiths

The concept of Open Access is central to everything that the Online Research Collections team do. Open Access is the process by which online research outputs are made free for anyone to view, read and download, without the need to log in or make a payment. Where possible, Open Access materials should be free of most copyright restrictions.

The team support and develop Open Access provision at Goldsmiths through our institutional repository Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) and our Open Access journal platform Goldsmiths Journals Online (GOJO). Currently, there over 21,00 Open Access items on GRO that can be accessed by anyone in the world with an internet connection and there have been nearly 3 million downloads from the repository since 2006.

Total number of items on GRO 21,053
Total number of Open Access items 7,487
Total number of downloads (all time) 2,998,225

 Open Access for students

In the past, our training and advocacy activities have largely focused on academic staff members and PhD students. Undergraduate and taught postgraduate students have largely been left out of our conversations around Open Access, so this was a great opportunity for us to engage with a new audience.

Our current training activities emphasise the benefits Open Access to researchers and the way that it can improve the global visibility, readership and impact of their work, both within academia and more widely. However, Open Access is also enormously beneficial to students as it offers easy access to research outputs, and they can benefit just as much as those further into their academic careers by knowing how to find, evaluate, and use Open Access resources.

Introducing Open Access to the Library Reps

Our session with the Library Reps started with an introduction to the concept of Open Access and then explored some of the key issues around copyright and licensing. We then demonstrated how to find Open Access resources on GRO and Library Search . We also introduced the Reps to some of the key Open Access resources available and useful browser tools to help them discover Open Access content online such as Unpaywall and Open Access Button .

The session was a really good way of raising awareness of Open Access with a new audience and the team is very enthusiastic about delivering future sessions to our students at Goldsmiths.

Marco Pace, Library Rep for Music, on Open Access

 Marco Pace, the postgraduate Library Rep for Music, attended the session and was invited to reflect on the relevance of Open Access to his studies and its impact on his role as a Library Rep.

As a Masters student, I believe that the session with the Open Access team was very useful in letting me understand an extensive range of resources that are available, whose existence I was not aware of. These databases would have helped me, for instance, preparing the piece of academic writing needed for my application to Goldsmiths: as a mature student who had been several years out of higher education, the only access I had to academic literature was through books I bought. Also, it is important to know that when I leave Goldsmiths I will still have considerable access to specialist research such as PhD theses and Goldsmiths researchers’ output.

Databases such as EThOS, the British Library electronic theses online service, provide me a wealth of resources which are extremely focused, all of which also include in their literature review up-to-date introductions to their topics. As an example, I remember last term struggling to find information contained in a thesis of which I could only access a preview of, while a quick search on this database immediately produced incredibly suited (and free to access) entries that I could have used for my PhD research proposal.

The team offered a thorough explanation of how GRO and Open Access systems in general assist the dissemination of the findings of researchers, and how the world of academic research publications work. As a student considering pursuing a career in academia these are valuable insights, which will also help me strengthen my PhD research proposal – I can more effectively state that my findings would be shared in an openly accessible form.

On this regard, as part of the Student Library Rep Project, I was asked yesterday to add a book to the library which is in fact a published version of a recent PhD thesis. It represents high quality research on a very narrow topic (while I must prioritise items that would be helpful for the most students), and the book in itself is quite expensive: I can now put that request on hold in case more relevant items are requested in the next month, and in the meantime explain to the student who requested it how to access it through Open Access systems.

I believe that Open Access systems and especially GRO should receive more attention from Masters students too, especially in the induction week at the beginning of the academic year when the resources of the library are presented. I would not exclude the idea of mentioning these resources somewhere in the “how to apply” page for postgraduate courses: consider returning students who have been out of academia for a while or students coming from conservatoires where they were never asked to write essays (both applied to me), awareness of these tools would highly simplify the preparation of academic writings, personal statements or research proposals.

-Marco Pace

Open Access Button and Unpaywall

There are few more frustrating things for researchers than finding a fantastic piece of research and then being shut out of reading it by a paywall. If your university library doesn’t subscribe to that particular journal, you might just give up, assuming you can’t get access.

However, there are a couple of tools out there that might be able to help you get free, legal access to paywalled articles.

Open Access Button is a free, open source tool that can be used online via the website or as a browser extension for Chrome or Firefox. If you’re online, just enter an article URL, DOI, PMID ID, Title or Citation.

OA Button 1

If the article is available, you’ll be provided a link to where it can be accessed (often an institutional repository):

OA Button 2

Alternatively, if you’ve downloaded the extension for Chrome or Firefox, just visit the article page on the journal’s website and click the OA button in your browser – OA Button 3

For example, the article below is not part of Goldsmiths’ subscriptions, therefore would theoretically need to be purchased to be read:

OA Button 4

Clicking on the Open Access Button shows its availability elsewhere:

OA Button 5

Unpaywall is a newly launched browser extension developed by Impactstory, a service that provides altmetrics to researchers, helping them measure and share the impacts of research outputs – not just traditional forms of publications such as journal articles, but also datasets and blog posts – where measuring impact has always been trickier.

The browser extension can be downloaded for Chrome and Firefox and allows you to find free, full text versions of articles, where they exist, with one click.

Below is another article that we would not have access to via Goldsmiths:

OA Button 6

Look to the right and you’ll see a green circle with an unlocked padlock – click on this to be directed to the free, full text version:

OA Button 7

LSE Impact Blog recently ran a piece on Unpaywall and its objectives, but it also provides a brief overview of the tools that are available to unlock research. For example, if you search on PubMed, there’s a LinkOut option, which finds copies of articles in institutional repositories. Recent articles in Nature and The Chronicle of Higher Education also highlight the benefits and successes of these tools. So next time you find an article and you’re being asked for extortionate sums of money for access, try Open Access Button or Unpaywall.

The Curious Case of the CICAM Cloth

Batik1

Goldsmiths Textile Collection (part of Special Collections & Archives) houses an array of eye catching & intriguing fabric based objects. From embroideries to cultural significant fashion garments, many of these items have been collected over time with the intention of inspiring creative and academic imaginations from a variety of disciplines. As this blog post will attempt to explore, many of the objects housed within the Textile Collection have a rich cultural and social history that extends far beyond the first impression.

A problem that many academic researchers will no doubt be familiar with is attempting to analyse the authentic story at the heart of a matter. Many an academic have scratched their heads upon finding that deeper inspection of a subject sometimes ends up complicating the matter at hand rather than resolving it. This sort of quandary is an everyday occurrence during research, and the objects based in the Textile Collection are no less exempt from such issues around history and identity. Such is the case for the subject of this blog post, a highly colourful waxed cotton print from Cameroon. This particular object gets quite significant amount of attention here in the Textile Collection, thanks in no small part to an attractive and somewhat psychedelic colour scheme, with a fiery orange hue that evokes vivid sensations of warmer climates south of the equator. Amongst the blazing backdrop is a highly presidential looking figure with the text ‘Republique Unie Du Cameroon/United Republic of Cameroon’, ‘JCNU’ and ‘YCNU’ sitting below it. A small insignia of ‘CICAM’ along the borders of the cloth gives some indication as to who the manufacturers might have been, or perhaps the organisation who might have commissioned production of the cloth.

Batik3 

As far as actual historical detail goes, this is where things get a bit more puzzling for the enigmatic wax cloth. As is sometimes the case with objects donated to archives, we don’t actually have much knowledge of the object’s provenance beyond that. So visual information of the cloth is all we initially have to go on. Crucially, we didn’t know who the presidential figure might be, the year the cloth was made or what it was specifically commemorating. The amount of gaps in the cloth’s story leaves the exact intention somewhat ambiguous, so equal measures of luck, intuition and detective work would be needed in order to ascertain more. Luckily, there is a lot of information on the cloth that can be garnered with the naked eye, and so this was as good a place as any from which to proceed.

Firstly we could arguably identify the cloth as being from Cameroon, as it bears the commemorative text of United Republic of Cameroon – the functioning government for the nation since 1972. Researching the cloth’s manufacturer, CICAM (Cotonnière industrielle du Cameroun), reveals it to be Cameroon’s national textiles company. This confirms both the origin and stately significance of it as an historical object. The cloth is likely commemorative in nature, as it seems to be celebrating both a public figure and an institution from Cameroon. These particular details seemed like a worthwhile place from which to proceed an investigation.

An internet search of ‘Cameroon commemorative cloth’ reveals that cloth making is a popular activity across the sub-Saharan continent, and has a particularly strong following in Cameroon. According to Tommy Miles from tomathon.com, they are referred to interchangeably as Wax Prints, Pagnes or Batiks. As he explains:

I’m using the French term ‘Pagne‘ as sometimes they are called “Pagnes commeratifs”. Coming from Portuguese, pagne really describes the cut of cloth not the patterns or content. It has come to be one of several terms used to denote these brightly colored, intricately designed, and socially significant cotton fabrics produced and worldwide, and especially throughout tropical Africa. In West Africa, these tend to be “Fancy” (i.e. cheaper, one sided) mass produced “roller” prints on cotton. Also known as Wax prints (like the more expensive double sided Waxes, by companies like Vlisco), and occasionally as “Batiks” (which they are not), the names come from the production process. Batiks use hand painted wax to mask off areas from dye. Most roller prints use resins to achieve this effect, but retain the vein like “crinkles” characteristic of hand printed fabrics with wax fixer, a technique also known as starch resist or wax resist. Machine made, they feature repeating patterns rolled onto a long cotton cloth, usually 46 or 47 inches wide. The forms and design traditions are ubiquitous in West Africa. The slightly different “khanga” form of similar cotton fabrics is popular in East Africa and points south.

Tom’s description is useful in providing us with important information for our investigation. He provides detail into the elaborate creative processes that go into producing a commemorative cloth, as well as describing their cultural importance for establishing historical events.

Returning to the visual details of the cloth, it seemed necessary to examine other details so as to get further indications about whom the presidential figure previously described might be. The text of ‘JCNU’ and ‘YCNU’ seems to be politically significant to the design of the cloth. Searching through library catalogues, Churchill Ewumbue-Monono’s Youth and Nation-building in Cameroon (2009) holds some answers as to what these acronyms might represent. JCNU and YCNU interchangeably to refer to the youth wing of Cameroon’s National Union (CNU). The youth party was set up by the CNU’s first president, Ahmadou Ahidjo in 1966, so it’s possible he may be the figure depicted on the cloth.

ahidjo3

Former & Current Presidents of Cameroon Ahmadou Ahidjo & Paul Biya

Batik2

However, the image isn’t a clear match for the one on the cloth so we couldn’t be positive. Furthermore, the cloth seems relatively modern and colourful in comparison to others from Ahidjo’s presidency. However, his successor Paul Biya, could also possibly be the figure in the wax cloth (albeit without the ubiquitous moustache). Biya took the presidency of Cameroon under somewhat controversial circumstances and remains in control to present day. Despite being involved in various scandals throughout his presidency, Biya has expressed a commitment to the JCNU/YCNU. In 1984 Biya began the roll out of a brand new youth policy for Cameroon. This included a New Deal agreement geared towards getting the youth of Cameroon into employment. It’s highly possible that the cloth was manufactured around this period to commemorate Biya’s new hopes for the youth of Cameroon.

Unfortunately, this is as far the investigation into the wax cloth has been able to get. We are unable to provide an exact photo match with the image on the wax cloth, making identification and provenance problematic once more. On the other hand, a high volume amount of information has been pieced together using some highly disparate sources. This information has led to the accumulation of knowledge about a moment in Cameroon’s national history. By getting us to explore further into this particular moment in time, the CICAM wax cloth is very successful in its function as a commemorative object. It demonstrates that the process of research can be a highly enlightening experience in lots of unexpected ways, and that objects of inquiry can be transformative in their effect on reseachers.

If anyone has any more precise information on the Cameroon Commemorative Cloth then we would be very excited to hear from you, so we can add more to the origin story of this unique object. Alternatively you wanted to view the wax cloth or any of our other wide variety of items in person, then contact the Textile Collection at textiles@gold.ac.uk for more details. Opening times are Tuesday – Thursday, 11 – 5.00 pm.

By Jack Mulvaney

Goldsmiths Research Online – August 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.08

Overview

40,585 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were Germany, United Kingdom and United States.

This month’s top downloaded item is a PhD thesis by Sandra Gaudenzi from the Centre for Cultural Studies.

PhD theses are again the most popular items in GRO. Two of the three top downloaded items this month were PhD theses:

The Living Documentary: from representing reality to co-creating reality in digital interactive documentary (2013) by Sandra Gaudenzi. (244 downloads)

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren. (211 downloads)

“On an Equal Footing with Men?” Women and Work at the BBC 1923-1939  by Catherine Murphy (189 downloads.)

New in GRO This Month

The GRO staff have been depositing the retrospective research outputs by faculty across the College this month. Research output that have been recently added to GRO can be found from the main GRO page

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the August report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – May 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.05

Overview

49,667 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, Germany, and United States.

This month’s top downloaded item is “Journalism: a profession under pressure?” a paper co-authored by Tamara Witschge, former research associate at the Department of Media and Communications’ Leverhulme Media Research Centre. Witschge’s paper looks at the changing aspects of the profession of journalism, and how these affect the autonomy of journalists.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (377 downloads).

Evaluating the theory of executive dysfunction in autism (2004) by Elisabeth L. Hill. (376 downloads)

FLOSSTV Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic (288 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Gustav Kuhn, Senior Lecturer at the Department of Psychology, has recently published an Open Access paper entitled “A framework for using magic to study the mind” in Frontiers in Psychology. You can download the full text here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11634/

Manuel Ramos Martinez from the Department of Visual Cultures deposited his paper “The Oxidation of the Documentary – The Politics of Rust in Wang Bing’s Tie Xi Qu: West of the Tracks,” recently published in Third Text. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11557/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the May report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – April 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.04

49,665 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

This month’s top downloaded item is an unpublished paper “Understanding the t-test as a variance ratio test, and why t-squared = F” by Rory Allen, Associate Lecturer in Psychology. Allen’s paper has reached many people through GRO even though it is not included in an academic publication, which shows the potential of Open Access repositories as a platform to circulate research.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Understanding the t-test as a variance ratio test, and why t-squared = F (2008) by Rory Allen (345 downloads).

FLOSSTV Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic (343 downloads).

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (311 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Dhiraj Murthy from the Department of Sociology published a paper entitled “Twitter and elections: are tweets, predictive, reactive, or a form of buzz?” in the Information, Communication & Society. Murthy’s paper looks at the relationship between the political activities on Twitter and the results from the ballot box. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11480/

Tom Perchard from the Department of Music has published a book called After Django: Making Jazz in Postwar France, which looks at the ways in which French musicians and critics interpret jazz in the mid-twentieth century. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11486/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the April report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – March 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.03

Overview

60,812 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and China.

Excitingly, this month we have a new number 1! The most downloaded entry in GRO this month was a paper entitled “Algorithmic States of Exception” by Daniel McQuillan, Lecturer in Creative & Social Computing. McQuillan’s paper looks at the practices of data mining through contemporary business models and mass surveillance, which he argues are leading to a new form of governance that he terms as “algorithmic states of exception,” a concept that he develops departing from philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s work.

The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

Algorithmic States of Exception (2015) by Daniel McQuillan (429 downloads).

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren (406 downloads).

The Theatrical Vision of Count Harry Kessler and its Impact on the Strauss-Hofmannsthal Partnership (2014), a doctoral thesis by Michael Reynolds (385 downloads).

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Tom Henri from the Department of Social, Therapeutic & Community Studies (STaCS) and Sophie Fuggle from the Centre for Cultural Studies co-edited a book entitled Return to the Street, which includes different approaches to the idea of the street from across multiple disciplines. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11402/

Barley Norton from the Department of Music has recently published a multimedia report entitled “Ca Trù Singing in Vietnam: Revival and Innovation” in the Smithsonian Folkways Magazine Winter/Spring 2015. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11420/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the March report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – February 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.02

Overview

46,755 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

Supplementary video material has been added to FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis and one of the most popular items in GRO. The three most popular items in GRO this month were:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Journalism: a profession under pressure? (2009) by Tamara Witschge and Gunnar Nygren.

Border Landscapes: Religion, Space and Movement on the Polish Belarusian Frontier (2014) by Aimée Edith Joyce.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Noortje Marres from the Department of Sociology deposited a paper entitled “Why Map Issues? On Controversy as a Digital Method” to be published in Science, Technology and Human Values. You can access more information about the paper here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11342/

Mathilda Tham from the Department of Design deposited a book section entitledCreative resilience thinking in fashion and textiles” to be published in The Handbook of Textile Culture, a book edited by Janis Jefferies (Department of Computing), Diana Wood Conroy and Hazel Clark. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11304/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the February report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.

Goldsmiths Research Online – January 2015 Update

GROBlog-2015.01

Overview

46,375 items were downloaded from GRO this month. The countries that downloaded the most were United Kingdom, United States, and Germany.

The most downloaded GRO item this month is again FLOSSTV, a PhD thesis completed by Adnan Hadziselimovic in 2012. The three most popular items in GRO were all PhD theses:

FLOSSTV: Free, Libre, Open Source Software (FLOSS) within participatory ‘TV hacking’ Media and Arts Practices (2012) by Adnan Hadziselimovic.

Border Landscapes: Religion, Space and Movement on the Polish Belarusian Frontier (2014) by Aimée Edith Joyce.

Netmodern: Interventions in Digital Sociology (2011) by Christopher Brauer.

New in GRO This Month

Research outputs available on GRO range from book chapters to music compositions, from artworks to journal articles. Here is a small selection from the recent deposits:

Deirdre Osborne from the Department of Theatre and Performance Studies co-edited (along with Mary F. Brewer and Lynette Goddard) a book entitled Modern and Contemporary Black British Drama. You can access more information about the book here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11078/

Alexander Watson from the Department of History deposited his paper “Unheard-of Brutality”: Russian Atrocities against Civilians in East Prussia, 1914-1915 published in The Journal of Modern History. You can access more information about the paper here: http://research.gold.ac.uk/11072/

More about GRO Stats

We are publishing brief reports every month if you are interested in seeing GRO’s monthly upload and download activity. You can access the January report here.

Deposit Your Work

If you are an academic or a PhD student at Goldsmiths, you can deposit your research outputs on GRO. If you need any help or guidance, please email the GRO team at gro@gold.ac.uk.